Saturday, September 25, 2010

Hurry Up! Butter Cookies!

photo by Anthony Palatta


A former creative writing student of mine sent me this recipe, a favorite in her family which comes from the Settlement Cookbook. They're called Hurry Up Butter Cookies, and if you're in a hurry, these are easy to mix together, though I found they took a while to bake in my dysfunctional oven. (More on that, another time.)

The ingredients include the usual suspects:  flour, butter, sugar, egg, plus some lemon zest and juice. I added 1/4 teaspoon of salt for good measure. You press the mixture into a 9 x 9, then sprinkled with chopped nuts. I went for almonds, my favorite.

My student, the talented fiction writer/poet/quilter Cathleen Bailey, told me to bake the cookies in a slow oven, meaning 300 degrees, for 20 to 30 minutes. I'm never sure what temperature is happening in the clunker in my apartment, so mine took a lot longer than that. One thing to note:  let the cookies sit for a while. They need time to settle.

After cutting them into squares, they taste a bit like a rich shortbread candy, perfect with tea or coffee. Here's Cathleen's recipe (plus my addition of salt).

HURRY UP BUTTER COOKIES
Tip:  Often I cut the recipe in half. There is still enough batter to spread in the pan, but the cookies are just a little thinner.


1 cup unsalted butter
1 cup sugar
1 egg, separated
Juice and zest of 1/2 lemon (back in the day, the ladies just said rind instead of zest, we're so fancy)
2 cups flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup chopped nuts
 
Cream butter and sugar, add egg yolk, continue beating, then add lemon and flour.  Mix thoroughly until well blended.  Pat dough into a greased and floured 9 inch square pan.  Brush with slightly beaten egg white, and sprinkle with nuts.  Bake in slow oven, 300 F for 20 to 30 minutes.  Cut while hot into squares.
 
My mother loved The Settlement Cook Book (c. 1950) which is where this recipe originates. 

1 comment:

  1. I have been making this recipe from my mother's Settlement House Cook Book for the past 70 years. Good taste, delightful aromas, and happy memories are part of the recipe.

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